Evaluation report 2012:7 Finland’s Contribution to Building Inclusive Peace in Nepal

Evaluation report 2012:7 Finland’s Contribution to Building Inclusive Peace in Nepal

Evaluation report 2012:7 Finland’s Contribution to Building Inclusive Peace in Nepal (PDF)

By:
Anita Kelles-Viitanen
Shobha Gautam

ISBN 978-952-281-029-8 (printed)
ISBN 978-952-281-030-4 (pdf)
ISSN 1235-7618

Evaluation of Finland’s contribution to building inclusive peace in Nepal

The evaluation looked at the gender and social inclusion in Finland’s peace programme in Nepal (2006–2011), how it responded to root causes of conflict, and reached the people. This work complements a wider Danish-led joint-evaluation.

Projects of the Nepal Peace Trust Fund (NPTF), IDEA International, and Alliance for Peace were studied. The evaluation also analysed the conceptual links of human rights to social inclusion in the projects of OHCHR and NHRC. A desk study and field-based investigation were made.

Finland responded with a relevant multidimensional strategy and a good mix of agencies. In 2006–2011, the assistance totalled €10.6 million (14% of Finland’s €77 million support to Nepal). The programme was cost-efficient and strategic, despite the lack of post-conflict analysis and a peace-building strategy. It aligned with Finland’s development policies and the Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) of Nepal, yet did not fully address it.

Projects were complementary, contributed to peace, increased security and inclusive democracy, strengthened the governing capacity of national institutions, and reached those affected by conflict.

Affirmative action for women and vulnerable groups was endorsed by the elections and interim constitution, and major national action plans (including UNSCR 1325 and 1820) were established. However, the targeting of beneficiaries was inadequate and their selection subject to political bias.

Future actions should provide more long-term support to assist the conflict-affected, women and vulnerable groups (3.7% allocated by NPTF) in their livelihoods and post-conflict traumas. These actions should address systemic barriers, build up the capacities of women, ethnic minorities, and other vulnerable people to influence democratic bodies and disaggregate monitoring data of benefit eligibility to strengthen the evidence-base.

Key words: Nepal, gender, peace-building, social cohesion, social inclusion.